Lot Sixty One Coffee Roasters

The Lot Sixty One Coffee Roasters logo from the awning outside the coffee shop on Kinkerstraat, west Amsterdam.Today I’m taking you back to June last year when I visited Amsterdam for World of Coffee. Other than the festival itself, my first experience of Amsterdam’s speciality coffee scene was Lot Sixty One Coffee Roasters. Set on the canal-side, on a corner by a bridge, I’m not sure there’s a more stereotypical location for an Amsterdam coffee shop and it was a perfect first introduction.

Split between a small front section and a slightly larger rear basement, this is the original Lot Sixty One, with a second branch having opened inside the Urban Outfitters clothing store on Kalverstraat. Despite the name, and the presence of a roaster in the basement during my visit, Lot Sixty One roasts at a new, appointment-only facility in Amsterdam, so this is now just a coffee shop (although “just” hardly does it justice). On the plus side, this means that there’s more room for seating, good news given its popularity.

There’s a house-blend on espresso, where it’s joined by a single-origin for the smaller drinks (espresso, flat white and cortado), plus there are single-origin pour-over and batch-brew options. If you’re hungry, there’s a decent selection of cake. Finally, it’s cashless, so bring a card!

You can read more of my thoughts after the gallery.

  • Lot Sixty One Coffee Roasters on Kinkerstraat, west Amsterdam.
  • This is the front, which acutally faces a canal, the Bilderdijkgracht. There's a bench here...
  • ... with more down the side, running along Kinkerstraat, captured in a rare quiet moment.
  • Stepping in through the door on the corner, the counter is off to the right.
  • The ceilings are really high, making it pretty much a cube.
  • The seating, seen here from the end of the counter, is along the left and at the back.
  • There's a bar down the window at the left-hand side...
  • ... and a shorter, two-person one at the back, overlooking...
  • ... the basement-like space at the rear!
  • This used to be the roastery, plus an overflow seating area.
  • The roaster, which was right at the bottom of the stairs, might be gone by now.
  • Talkig of the stairs, here they are, broad, but steep.
  • In the right-hand corner at the front, a barrel has been repurposed as a coffee table...
  • Beyond this, running all the way to the back, is a lovely, wooden bar.
  • There's another, shorter one on the left-hand side...
  • ... seen here from the top of the stairs.
  • There are three windows at street level at the top of the wall.
  • To the right of the roaster is another barrel/coffee table, with a training counter behind.
  • The training counter sometimes has a second espresso machine.
  • Okay. Time to go back to the front section.
  • The view from half way up the stairs.
  • The view from half way up the stairs, part two.
  • Talking of views, I liked this reflection in the casing of the espresso machine.
  • And the actual light in question.
  • More lights. Despite all the windows, Lot Sixty One has plenty of light-fittings.
  • These, down in the basement, were my favourites.
  • To business. The counter dominates the right-hand side...
  • ... while at the front, in the window to the right of the door, there's a small retail section.
  • There's more interesting stuff on the shelves behind/above the counter.
  • The menus, meanwhile, are high up on the back wall.
  • The cakes are at the far end, underneath the till.
  • Useful to know.
  • The espresso machine, a sleek Kees van der Westen, is at the far end of the counter.
  • Filter, meanwhile, is sorted out behind the counter.
  • An espresso. Not mine, sadly.
  • Looks good though.
  • And someone else's latte.
  • This was mine. A flat white and a cinnamon roll.
  • My cinnamon roll, a classic of the type.
  • My flat white was pretty awesome too.
  • I shall leave you with my lovely latte art.
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Lot Sixty One Coffee Roasters is in west Amsterdam, just outside the main girdle of canals and not far from Monks Coffee Roasters. On a corner, where Kinkerstraat crosses over the Bilderdijkgracht canal, it occupies a small, cube-shaped street-level space, with lovely high ceilings and windows on two sides, one facing the canal, the other facing Kinkerstraat. As if it couldn’t make up its mind which street it’s on, the door is right on the corner, at 45⁰ to both Kinkerstraat and Bilderdijkgracht. For convenience sake, we’ll say that the front of Lot Sixty One faces east, overlooking Bilderdijkgracht.

On the warm, summer’s morning I was there, sitting outside seemed to be the order of the day, with a four-person bench running along under the front window, partly shaded by a large awning. More benches, perhaps seating ten, run down the left-hand side, along Kinkerstraat. This is perhaps just as well, since there’s not a lot of seating inside. The counter, with its sleek Kees van der Westen Spirit espresso machine, takes up most of the right-hand side, while to the left of the door, a window-bar runs alongside Kinkerstraat, with six close-spaced stools. However, there’s more.

A short, two-person bar runs along the left-hand side at the back, which is open, overlooking a basement-like space to the rear, accessed by a steep flight of seven, broad, short, wooden steps. These run down from the end of the counter, leading to a square, tiled room (walls and floor) that used to serve as both roastery and over-spill seating area. It’s maybe twice the size of the upstairs, extending a little to the right. It’s quite bright down here, with plenty of borrowed light from the front/upstairs, plus there are three small, square windows high up on the left-hand wall at street level.

Unless it’s since been moved, a large Probat roaster is against the back wall, opposite the bottom of the stairs, cooling pan to the fore, while off to the right is a small counter used for training. Seating is provided by two broad wooden bars, one along either wall. The left-hand bar is slightly cramped, tucked down the side of the roaster, while the right-hand one is slightly longer, sitting maybe six, although the near end is right next to the water tap. There are also a couple of metal barrels down here, doubling as coffee tables, one in front of the training counter, with three fold-up chairs, and one to the right of the stairs, with a pair of low stools. If you have a bad back and can’t sit down, the bars are fantastic, by the way, since they’re just the right height to stand at.

I started my day, and my exploration of Amsterdam’s speciality coffee scene, with a flat white made with the house-blend. I was tempted by the single-origin espresso, but barista said no, if I was going with milk, I should stick to the house-blend. I like a barista who isn’t afraid to say no to a customer. I was rewarded with a lovely, smooth coffee, nothing too challenging, which was the ideal start to my day. I paired this with a cinnamon roll, a classic of the type, slightly warm, slightly sticky, not too sweet, and bursting with cinnamon flavour. Perfect!

112 KINKERSTRAAT • 1053 ED AMSTERDAM • NETHERLANDS
https://lotsixtyone.coffee +31 (0) 6 16054227
Monday 08:00 – 18:00 Roaster Lot Sixty One (espresso + filter)
Tuesday 08:00 – 18:00 Seating Bars, Benches (outside)
Wednesday 08:00 – 18:00 Food Cake
Thursday 08:00 – 18:00 Service Counter
Friday 08:00 – 18:00 Cards Amex, Mastercard, Visa (no cash)
Saturday 09:00 – 18:00 Wifi Free (with code)
Sunday 09:00 – 18:00 Power Limited
Chain Local Visits 24th June 2018

For once I got somewhere before my friend Bex of Double Skinny Macchiato fame. You can see what she made of Lot Sixty One when she visited in December (when the roaster was still there).


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  1. Pingback: World of Coffee 2018 | Brian's Coffee Spot

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