Steampunk, The Warehouse

Thumbnail - Steampunk (DSC_6712t)I first discovered Steampunk as a roaster when I visited Machina Espresso in Edinburgh in April 2014.

I tried the Tiger Stripes blend and was so impressed that I bought a bag to take home with me. Back then I only knew of Steampunk as a roaster and didn’t realise that it had recently opened The Warehouse, a large café in its home town of North Berwick, just along the coast from Edinburgh.

So, on my next trip to Edinburgh, I made a point of heading east to North Berwick. I’m pleased to report that I was as delighted by The Warehouse as I was by that first espresso that I had at Machina Espresso!

Spread over two floors of a lovely old building, which retains many of its original features, The Warehouse is an ideal space for a roaster-cum-café (I’ve covered the roasting side of Steampunk in a separate Saturday Supplement). There’s a large, exterior courtyard, which, on the sunny day I was there, saw good use, while downstairs you share space with both roastery and counter. Upstairs, there’s table service and a full food menu, which is all prepared in the kitchen in the corner.

November 2015: I ran into the Steampunk guys at Cup North, and discovered that Steampunk now only roasts single-origins.

You can read more of my thoughts after the gallery.

  • The Warehouse, by Steampunk, cuts quite a figure in North Berwick (seen from the car park).
  • An A-board on the pavement confirms that you have reached the right place!
  • Coming in from the street, you go through the large, paved courtyard.
  • Let's just stop to admire the sunset for a moment...
  • Right, where were we? Oh yes, the courtyard. Nice seating options.
  • In case you're in any doubt where you are, there's another A-board against the wall.
  • A driveway leads down the side of the building, with more outside seating options...
  • ... and opposite, the doors into The Warehouse.
  • The view from just inside the doors, taking in the counter, downstairs seating & upstairs.
  • Immediately to the right of the door is this lovely, old (& fully functional) stove. Plus chairs.
  • In the far corner, one of the three downstairs tables.
  • The table (and chairs) in more detail. I loved the furniture!
  • A case full of coffee and coffee kit. And teapots.
  • Tucked away behind the seating in the front corner is Steampunk's Probat roaster.
  • There's also this very festive-looking espresso machine.
  • The view from this end of downstairs, looking along the counter and towards the doors.
  • The last of the downstairs seating are these three stools at the end of the counter.
  • Talking of which, here's the counter in all it's glory...
  • ... and yes, that's an old bicycle hanging on the back wall. And why not?
  • Talking of old, check out the till. Sadly it's had an upgrade; there's an iPad inside!
  • Time to go upstairs. The stairs are through that door in the far corner.
  • However, before you go, do look up. Here's the kitchen, to the right as you come in...
  • ... and to the left, here's some of the seating.
  • Directly above the doors are these old loading doors, now a window.
  • Instructions for customers. Table service; I approve of that!
  • Up we go.
  • A panoramic view from the top of the stairs.
  • Behind you and to your right is this table and then, beyond that, above the stairs...
  • ... is this wonderful seating area. Check out those chairs! Especially the rocking chair.
  • Pride of place goes to Steampunk's second working stove. I know where I want to sit!
  • The view of the upstairs from the comfy chairs.
  • Some of the upstairs tables, arranged in two rows.
  • The view down between the two rows.
  • There are tables of varying sizes: this is probably the biggest.
  • Right at the end, there's this four-person round table.
  • The view back down the upstairs from by the kitchen. Check out the rafters.
  • Another view of the large table, now with its candle-lantern restored.
  • There are smaller versions on other tables.
  • If it's not dark outside, I suspect that these would let in plenty of light!
  • Across the way from them, the loading bay also lets in the light.
  • Before you go, don't forget to look down.
  • I love this view of the stove. Check out the designs on the table.
  • Obligatory light-fitting shot. These beauties are hanging (in frames) above the stairs.
  • I normally don't take photos in the toilets, but this was too good to miss...
  • ... as was the wash basin.
  • Okay, down to business. If you sit upstairs, there's a full food menu (and table service).
  • Meanwhile, downstairs, there are plenty of soft drink choices...
  • ... plus a lot of cake!
  • The cake in detaill.
  • More cake detail.
  • There's also chocolate made by a neighbour using Steampunk's coffee...
  • ... talking of which, here's the coffee menu.
  • There's also a very comprehensive tea menu.
  • However, this is what I came for.
  • This time I had the Velo blend as an espresso, with a brownie.
  • The brownie, which was excellent, in more detail.
  • More cake was consumed. My friend Steve had a brownie and a slice of Welsh cake.
  • Meanwhile Suzie had a slice of the lemon polenta cake.
  • Finally, I leave you with my excellent espresso in close-up.
Photo Carousel by WOWSlider.com v4.6

The Warehouse cuts an imposing figure in North Berwick, standing in glorious isolation opposite the ruined St Andrew Kirk. A large, two-storey, iron-framed brick building, it was originally a joiners workshop, and, slightly perversely, stands perpendicular to the street. Not far from the train station there’s also a car park adjoining it on the left-hand side. A wide, stone-flagged courtyard sits between The Warehouse and the street, while a driveway down the right-hand side gives access to the main doors.

A wooden bench is built into the stone wall that forms the left-hand edge of the courtyard, which has a scattering of tables and chairs. Along the driveway, there are two more small tables and a bench opposite the doors.

Double-doors open into the spacious downstairs, where you are greeted by the counter, a large, wooden affair, occupying a sizable space in front of you. To your left, a doorway leads to the stairs, while to your right there’s a small seating area, beyond which Steampunk’s Probat roaster lurks, surrounded by sacks of green beans. Although spread over two floors, the upper floor has something of a mezzanine effect, and directly above you, The Warehouse is open all the way to the rafters, which gives it a glorious sense of space, as well as making the two floors feel connected.

Just to the right of the door is a wonderful old iron stove, in full working order, flanked by a pair of armchairs and a table. Beyond is the remainder of the downstairs seating, a pair of large, round tables, although you can also perch on one of three stools at the end of the counter.

Upstairs has the bulk of the seating: you arrive in the far left-hand corner, two rows of tables stretching out ahead of you. Smaller, three-person tables line the back wall, while opposite them there’s an eclectic mix of larger tables. These line the railings that overlook the entrance. At the far end, on the right-hand side, is the kitchen, while immediately to your right is a large, three-person table. Beyond this, in the corner above the stairs, is another old stove with a cluster of six comfy chairs.

The décor is lovely, with exposed iron frames and rafters, wooden floorboards (upstairs) and a concrete floor (downstairs). The walls are a mix of bare- or painted-brick, while the left-hand wall is covered in patterned wallpaper. It’s full of fantastic, old, wooden furniture which gives it a great feel.

We had my friends’ dog with us, so sat downstairs (which, in fairness, was where all the cake was). Between us, we tried two types of brownie, lemon polenta cake and Welsh tea bread. I think I made the best choice, since my (chocolate) brownie was rich and gooey, a superb example of its ilk.

The Warehouse was serving the Velos blend, which I l had as an espresso and loved just as much as the Tiger Stripes I’d had at Machina Espresso. It was smooth, dark, but not at all bitter. In fact, for a relatively dark roast, it was surprisingly sweet. I also tried the Rocky II blend, a more typical third-wave offering. This, I must confess, was less to my taste, particularly after having the Velos blend, which could have been roasted for me!

49A KIRK PORTS • NORTH BERWICK • EH39 4HL
www.steampunkcoffee.co.uk +44 (0) 1620 893030
Monday 09:00 – 17:00 Roaster Steampunk (espresso + filter)
Tuesday 09:00 – 17:00 Seating Tables, Comfy Chairs, Counter, Tables (outside)
Wednesday 09:00 – 17:00 Food Breakfast, Lunch, Cake
Thursday 09:00 – 17:00 Service Order at Counter/Table (upstairs)
Friday 09:00 – 17:00 Cards Mastercard, Visa
Saturday 09:00 – 17:00 Wifi Free (with code)
Sunday 10:00 – 17:00 Power Limited
Chain No Visits 30th November 2014

For an alternative (and more up-to-date) view, see what fellow coffee blogger, The Pourover, made of Steampunk during a visit at the end of 2016.


If you liked this post, please let me know by clicking the “Like” button. If you have a WordPress account and you don’t mind everyone knowing that you liked this post, you can use the “Like this” button right at the bottom instead.


Don’t forget that you can share this post with your friends using the drop-down “Share” menu below.

10 thoughts on “Steampunk, The Warehouse

  1. Pingback: 2014 Awards – Best Outdoor Seating | Brian's Coffee Spot

  2. Pingback: 2014 Awards – Best Espresso | Brian's Coffee Spot

  3. Pingback: 2014 Awards – Best Roaster/Retailer | Brian's Coffee Spot

  4. Pingback: 2014 Awards – Best Physical Space | Brian's Coffee Spot

  5. Pingback: Steampunk Coffee | Brian's Coffee Spot

  6. Pingback: Machina Espresso | Brian's Coffee Spot

  7. Pingback: My Top 10 UK Coffee Shops (Not in London!)

  8. Pingback: Boston Tea Party, Ringwood | Brian's Coffee Spot

  9. Pingback: 2015 Awards – Best Roaster/Retailer | Brian's Coffee Spot

  10. Pingback: Allpress Dalston | Brian's Coffee Spot

Please let me know what you think