Peixoto

The Peixoto logo from the wall outside, both esposing the crop to cup philosophy and explaining how to pronouce the name: "Pay - Sho - Tow".When it comes to speciality coffee in Phoenix, you need to include the surrounding cities, particularly Scottsdale (east), Tempe (southeast), and, beyond that, today’s destination: Chandler. And when it comes to Chandler, there’s one name on everyone’s lips: Peixoto. Indeed, several people suggested I’d be well served making a specific trip just to visit Peixoto, so having arrived on the early flight from Miami exactly a week ago, and with a free afternoon to kill, I pointed my newly-collected hire car in the direction of Chandler…

What marks Peixoto out as special is its crop-to-cup philosophy, taking the ethos of direct trade to its logical conclusion. I’ve seen this in coffee-producing countries such as Vietnam (Oriberry Coffee) and China (Lanna Coffee), but this is the first time I’ve seen it outside of those regions. In Peixoto’s case, (some of) the coffee comes from the Peixoto family farm in Brazil, imported directly to the roastery in the corner of the coffee shop and, from there, straight to your cup. Short of moving to Brazil, it doesn’t come more direct trade than that!

There’ll be more on this in Peixoto’s Meet the Roaster feature, but today I’m focusing on the coffee shop.

You can read more of my thoughts after the gallery.

  • Heading south on Arizona Avenue, you'll find Peixoto on the right-hand side of the street.
  • Alternatively, coming from the parking lot to the south (like I did) you get this view.
  • A helpful sign on the wall both explains Peixoto's philosophy and how to pronounce it!
  • Turning the corner, here's the front again, with its outdoor seating and door to the right.
  • A panoramic view from just inside the door.
  • Immediately to the right of the door there's a set of retail shelves...
  • ... while directly ahead, occupying most of the right-hand wall, is the counter.
  • The seating is arrayed around the edges, starting with this window-bar to the left...
  • ... and continuing to this pair of comfortable chairs in the corner at the front.
  • One of the comfortable chairs, much loved, clearly!
  • The seating continues with a bench seat against the left-hand wall/windows.
  • There's also a communal table in the centre of the room...
  • ... with seating provided by stools eight low stools.
  • Keeping on around the edges, there's a three-seater sofa, armchair in the corner...
  • ... behind which, in the corner at the back on the left, is the roaster.
  • There's a row of five stools down the right-hand side of the roastery area...
  • ... where you can sit and watch the roaster in action if you like.
  • The final seating area is at the counter itself, where there's another row of stools.
  • Naturally, my eye was drawn to the magnificent array of lights above the counter...
  • ... seen here from another angle.
  • The lights in more detail...
  • The rest of the lights in more detail!
  • Some of the lights are so fierce that they have to be kept in cages.
  • This one too!
  • There are also more conventional lights, including these hanging at the front.
  • Last lighting picture, I promise!
  • In the corner, above the comfortable chairs, there's this map on the wall.
  • It shows the Americas, with the farm (in Brazil) and the coffee shop (in Arizona).
  • This is at the heart of Peixoto's philosophy, since it's the family farm down in Brazil!
  • This is crop to cup at its purest: the first time I've seen it outside of a producing country.
  • Nice use of the local flora.
  • Unsurprisingly, the retail shelves to the right of the door are full of Peixoto's coffee.
  • Pride of place goes to coffee from the family farm...
  • ... although there are other Brazilian beans available...
  • ... including decaf.
  • However, Peixoto also roasts other origins, including this Ethiopean Koke.
  • More retail bags, including Nicaraguan and Kenyan single-origins.
  • At the back, opposite the roaster, are more retail shelves, this time with merchandising.
  • Down to business. You're greeted by the espresso machine when you enter...
  • ... although the business end of the counter, including the till, is around to the left.
  • The cakes/pastries are down here too, or they would be if they hadn't already gone!
  • The ubiquitous EK-43, for grindiing the retail bags and the filter coffee.
  • The menu is on the back wall, to your left as you stand at the till.
  • The business end of Peixoto is off to the right as you stand at the till.
  • The Sanremo Cafe Racer espresso machine faces the door, so you can watch it in action.
  • Meanwhile, the pour-over is on the counter immediately to your right...
  • ... with the bulk-brewer and boilers on the wall behind them.
  • There are five different single-origins to choose from on pour-over.
  • Guess where I sat? And no, that's not my coffee.
  • I had a cappuccino, made with beans from the family farm.
  • I'll leave you with a closer look at the latte art in my cappuccino.
Javascript Sliders by WOWSlider.com v4.6

Peixoto is in the heart of Chandler, a block south of the literal centre on South Arizona Avenue, although the address is West Boston Street. It’s on the southeast corner of a small block on the corner of Arizona and Boston, the front of the store facing east onto Arizona Avenue and the side overlooking a large parking lot to the south, handy when you’re driving.

The location means it catches plenty of sun and, with tall picture windows on both sides, it’s very bright inside. Even on a “winter” day in February, the sun was so strong that the blinds had to be down on the south side to stop us all frying!

The layout is essentially square, with the door slightly-recessed in the right-hand corner. There are a handful of tables outside on the pavement out front for those who really want the sun, but the bulk of the seating is inside, where the tall ceilings and air-conditioning keep it cool, even when the roaster is going (which is most days).

It’s a gorgeous space, with, ironically, lots of lights. It’s defined by the large counter, which is directly ahead of you and occupies most of the right-hand wall, and the roastery, which is an open area in the opposite corner at the back on the left. The seating, with the exception of two communal tables, is arranged around the edges. These two tables form an L in the centre of the room. There’s a six-person table parallel to front, while an eight-person one which between the counter on the right and the windows on the left.

There’s a window bar along front to the left of the door, then comes a pair of armchairs in front-left corner. A long bench follows along left-hand wall/windows, complete with a line of two-person tables. Next there’s another armchair, then a sofa, its back to the roaster. Carrying on, there’s a narrow bar down the right-hand side of the roastery area with five low stools.

Finally, you can sit along the left-hand side of the counter on one of six high stools. There’s plenty of space on the broad counter-top and you have excellent views of the pour-over (directly in front of you) and good views of the Sanremo Café Racer espresso machine which faces the door at the front of the counter off to your right.

Peixoto only roasts single-origins, one of which, from the family farm, is available on both espresso and pour-over, while the others are only available on pour-over. There’s also bulk-brew, plus a decaf Brazilian on espresso/pour-over. Other than the beans from the family farm, which are available all year round, the single-origins are seasonal, lasting anything from one month to four months, depending on how much has been bought in.

The espresso menu has the usual options (3oz macchiato, 5oz cortado, 6oz cappuccino, 8oz latte, with a 16oz option to cater to the local market). Pour-over options include Aeropress, V60 and Kalita Wave, all made into Pyrex cylindrical jugs from Ikea, before being served in mugs. The pour-overs can be made over ice, while there’s the usual cold-brew and nitro options too.

Although this was my first visit, I was familiar with Peixoto’s single-origins, a colleague having given me several bags of its coffee over the last year which I’ve enjoyed at home as pour-overs. I therefore went for an espresso-based drink, taking barista’s recommendation of a cappuccino, served with a glass of water. This was an excellent choice, the coffee going very well with the milk, which highlighted the coffee’s rich, chocolately notes. Perfect.

11 WEST BOSTON STREET, SUITE #6 • CHANDLER • PHOENIX • AZ 85225 • USA
www.peixotocoffee.com +1 480-275-2843
Monday 06:00 – 18:00 Roaster Roaster (espresso + filter)
Tuesday 06:00 – 18:00 Seating Window-bar, Counter, Tables, Armchairs; Tables (outside)
Wednesday 06:00 – 18:00 Food Pastries
Thursday 06:00 – 18:00 Service Counter
Friday 06:00 – 20:00 Cards Amex, Mastercard, Visa
Saturday 06:00 – 20:00 Wifi Free (with code)
Sunday 07:00 – 18:00 Power No
Chain No Visits 29th January 2018

If you liked this post, please let me know by clicking the “Like” button. If you have a WordPress account and you don’t mind everyone knowing that you liked this post, you can use the “Like this” button right at the bottom instead.


Don’t forget that you can share this post with your friends using the buttons below.

2 thoughts on “Peixoto

  1. Pingback: Brian’s Coffee Spot: Flying in the USA | Brian's Coffee Spot

Please let me know what you think. Guidelines for comments are in the "Posts" drop-down menu.